If you want to experience 2,700 acres of off-road riding fun, grab some riding buddies or your family and head out to the Red River Motorcycle Trails in Bulcher, Texas. Red River was established 1972 and has come to be known by several different names. Bulcher and Muenster are two of the names you’ll hear. Sometimes it’s mistaken for Red River ATV Park, which is in Bonham, Texas. It would be difficult and very time consuming to map all the trails here. Let’s just put it this way, you won’t get bored on 2,700 acres. The terrain varies from thick trees with flowing sandy trails to hill climbs. Most of the climbs are sand but there are some huge rocky climbs too. Sandy river bottoms present a real treat or challenge, depending on how you want to attack them. Large, sandy play areas are a favorite of many. Red River is a great family recreation area to start out new or young riders. If you want to take a break from riding, try fishing, swimming or just lounging in the river. Admission is $25 a day for non-members. A membership allows you to ride for $15 a day and allows

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Before seriously starting your riding season, there are a few things you should consider doing. License: Check now to be sure your license isn’t about to expire. If it is, make arrangements now to get a new one. Be sure your new license incudes your motorcycle endorsement. That’s also important if you moved to another state and need to get a new license. Bike insurance: Make sure your motorcycle insurance policy is still in force and make sure you have proof of insurance for your ride. This may be a good time to consider updating your policy to reflect the current value of your bike and the accessories, or make any changes to your liability and/or uninsured/underinsured coverage. Health insurance: Check your health insurance policy to ensure that your policy will cover injuries suffered in a motorcycle crash. Check your policy under “exclusions.” That’s where your insurance company spells out what the policy won’t cover. Riding gear: Check your riding gear to make sure it still fits, or to see if there is something you need, like good riding gloves. Motorcycle: Did you winterize your bike before putting it away? Now is a great time to have your bike serviced

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If you’ve been forced to stay home like many of us, you may be running out of things to do around the house. Actually, that’s a good thing. Grab some popcorn, plop down in front of your smart TV or computer and enjoy these 10 motorcycling movies and documentaries. You should be able to find them all if you hunt around on streaming services such as Amazon Prime, Hulu, Netflix, Vudu or even YouTube. “The World’s Fastest Indian” (2005) (photo above) stars Anthony Hopkins as AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and land-speed racer Burt Munro. Follow the New Zealander’s dream to run his home-built 1920 Indian Scout on the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. He finally makes it to the salt in the 1960s while he is in his 60s. Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WeSJ1-_hZg “Never Ride Alone” (2018). Scott Englund rides his dirtbike alone in the Andes in Peru and documents it on film, with some scary situations and spectacular shots using set-up cameras and a drone. Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cv4IGaSnRMU “Wild Hogs” (2007) is a hilarious comedy featuring four middle-aged friends (John Travolta, Tim Allen, Martin Lawrence and William Macy) who feel their lives are in a rut. They need a change. They

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Nelson Rigg USA is offering AMA members a 20 percent discount on all its brands like Nelson Rigg Journey soft luggage for streetbikes, tourers and cruisers as well as Rigg-Gear products for ATVs and UTVs. The company also has products for dual sport and adventure-touring riders, including the company’s Sahara & Hurricane Series 100 percent waterproof luggage. Whether you need a tank bag for your road bike, a tail bag for your dual sport or a carrier for your pooch, Nelson Rigg has it. The company’s Journey Highway Cruiser Magnetic Tank Bag (above, $81.95), has a tapered fit for most cruiser tanks, lockable zipper pulls that are easily operated with gloves, a clear touch screen device friendly top pocket, integrated rain cover and more. With dimensions of 10 inches in length by 8 inches wide by 4 inches high (10 x 8 x 6 expanded) the bag holds five liters (seven expanded). The Trails End Adventure tail bag ($149.95) mounts to most racks and seats. It has heavy duty webbing and buckles for secure mounting, water-resistant lockable zippers, inner self-fastening straps to secure contents and a rubberized carry handle for easy transport. The bag measures 14 inches x 11 inches

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A lot of riders are forced to spend long hours inside the house these days. But we can still have some motorcycling fun. For example, have you ever daydreamed about owning your own motorcycle repair shop, or riding the famed Isle of Man TT? How about doing insane tricks on a dirtbike, or racing speedway? What about riding Route 66? You can do all that and more in the safety of your own home on your computer. Here are some of the videogames that will let you experience those daydreams without losing your shirt operating your own motorcycle shop or losing part of your hide in a motorcycle trick gone wrong. On the flip side, you could be a great business person and get rich, or be an awesome racer and get to be crowned world champion. Some of these games also have demos so you don’t need to shell out hard-earned cash without playing part of the game first. Find these games and more at www.steampowered.com. “Biker Garage: Mechanic Simulator” (photo above) allows you to be a motorcycle mechanic, buying, repairing and selling bikes. You start your adventure in a home workshop with the goal of becoming a world-class

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For many of us, the 1970s were some of the best years in motorcycling history. Here’s a look back at some of the things that made the 1970s a great motorcycling decade. In 1970, AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Dick Mann won the Daytona 200 on the new Honda CB750. Mann ran strong all day and held off challenges by former world champion and future AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Mike “The Bike” Hailwood. and future AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famers Gene Romero and Gary Nixon. The win gave Mann his first victory at the Daytona classic and marked Honda’s first win in an AMA national. In 1971 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Bruce Brown produced his classic motorcycling movie “On Any Sunday.” The movie conveyed the fun and enjoyment that motorcycling added to people’s lives and helped spur the explosive growth of motorcycling in the 1970s. AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Don Emde won the Daytona 200 on a Yamaha TZ350 in 1972. This was Yamaha’s first Daytona 200 win and the smallest motorcycle to ever win the race. With his victory in the 1972 Daytona 200, Emde became the first son of a former Daytona 200 winner to

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A 1967 Husqvarna 360 used by AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer Bud Ekins to earn an International Six Day Trial gold medal sold for $15,000 at the Mecum motorcycle auction held March 11-14 at State Farm Stadium in Glendale, Ariz. Other Hall of Famer-related motorcycles sold at the auction include a 1974 Suzuki 400 TM RN motocrosser reportedly built for Hall of Famer John DeSoto to race and a 1973 Triumph X75 Hurricane designed by Hall of Famer Craig Vetter. A bike that didn’t sell was a 1926 Excelsior Super X alcohol-burning factory flat tracker/hillclimber once owned by Ekins and then Hall of Famer Steve McQueen. The rare 750cc, two-cylinder still runs. Ekins was one America’s pioneering off-road motorcyclists and one of the first Americans to compete in the World Championship Motocross Grand Prix circuit in Europe during the 1950s. He rode the 1967 Husqvarna 360 that sold at the auction to a gold medal in the 1967 ISDT (now known as the International Six Day Enduro) in Poland. After his racing career, Ekins went on to become one of Hollywood’s leading stuntmen. His most famous stunt was the climactic motorcycle jump scene in the 1963 movie, “The Great Escape,”

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The weather is finally getting good enough in most of the country to get out and ride. Here are seven tips to get you started. First, check your bike. Fresh fuel, fresh oil, chain oiled, hydraulic fluids topped off or replaced, fresh coolant, tires in good shape, all bolts tight, and all lights working are all a must. Next, check yourself: If you’re lucky enough to live somewhere you can ride year-round, great! But the rest of us can benefit with a bit of a mental and physical tune-up. Find an empty parking lot and practice hard braking, swerving and tight turns for an hour or so. Third, SEE (Search, Evaluate, Execute) all the time. Search out and identify potential dangers, evaluate what needs to be done and execute your plan. Fourth, consider your lane position. The left wheel track is a good starting place, but be open to varying your position within your lane to maintain a buffer between you and potential dangers. Fifth, keep asking “What if?” What will you do if that car turns in front of you? What if that dog runs out? What if that van moves over into your lane? Be ready for anything.

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Let the world know that you are a serious rider and that you support riders’ freedoms by proudly wearing an AMA Life Member patch and a pin. You can get those, and more, at www.amagear.com. The patches and pins show everyone that you belong to the largest motorcyclist advocacy organization in the world. A Charter Life Member patch, a Life Member patch, a Freedom patch or an AMA black patch are $5 each. An AMA Life Member Plus pin is $10, a Charter Life member/25-year pin is $3, and a Life Member pin is $3. Other milestone-year pins including 70-year and 60-year pins are available for $7 each. If you simply want to let people know that you are an AMAzing motorcyclist, you can do that by buying an “I’M AMA-ZING” jersey for $35. All proceeds go toward promoting the motorcycle lifestyle and protecting the future of motorcycling.

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Want to spice up your dirt riding in California with a little variety? Then try riding at the Prairie City State Vehicular Recreation Area that is 20 miles east of Sacramento and 3 miles south of U.S. 50. The 800-plus-acre park, operated by the Off-Highway Vehicle Division of the state Department of Parks and Recreation, offers a variety of interesting terrain and trails for ATVs, dirt bikes and four-wheel drive vehicles, plus the famed Hangtown motocross track. What kind of terrain? Flat, open grasslands, rolling hills with oak trees and acres of cobbled mine tailings. The terrain is challenging for beginners and experts. There are trails throughout the motorcycle/ATV area. Most of the trails are beginner- or intermediate-level trails, with only a few expert trails. The trails are two-way trails, so use caution around blind curves, and on hills and jumps. Keep to the right of the trail when possible. All riders must wear helmets and should wear proper protective clothing. Each off-highway vehicle must have a U.S. Forest Service-approved spark arrestor. A current California off-road vehicle registration (green sticker) or highway registration is required at all times when operating bikes on public land. The red sticker season at the

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With riding season here everyone is itching to get back on the road. But before you head out, it’s a good idea to give your trusty steed a once-over to ensure the bike is as ready to go as you are. Here’s a quick checklist put together by the good folks at the Motorcycle Safety Foundation to help you get ready to hit the road. 1. Tires and wheels. Since these are where you and the road meet, they’re probably the most important things to look over. A problem can affect handling, sometimes severely. Check to be sure your rims are free of dents, your spokes are tight and straight, your tire pressures are correct. Make sure you have plenty of tread. 2. Controls and cables. A snapped throttle or clutch cable can leave you on the side of the road, so check those. Operate anything connected to a cable and make sure that levers and cables feel smooth and don’t bind. Apply the front brake and push the bike forward. The brake should feel firm, and the front wheel should not move. Check the rear brake in the same fashion. 3. Lights and horn. Seeing and being seen are

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There aren’t many motorcycle-related songs that riders have been able to enjoy over the years, but there are a few. And some have memorable lines that, when you hear them, you instantly remember the song. Can you match these lyrics to the songs? Here’s a test of your motorcycling musical knowledge. The answers are below. 1. “I started out with this basket case, I thought I’d made quite a find, I paid my money and took the thing home, Folks thought I was outta my mind, Cussin’ and kickin’ I got the thing runnin’, Headed down the road with my motor just a-gunnin’, There came a knockin’ noise down by my shoe, I’ve got them broke down Harley Davidson blues.” 2. “Ain’t got no tricks up my sleeve, Ain’t got no reason to believe, I’ve been looking for a sign, Love shouldn’t be so hard to find, I’ve been sleeping on your couch, Just been layin’ here alone. I’ve been doing without, Oh, you’ve been doing me wrong, Nothing left here to decide, I think it’s time for me to ride.” 3. “Hard roads and endless lines flow through his veins, Cold steel and hot fuel injected ‘s the dream

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Racing bikes for the street have always had an allure for the go-fast crowd, and that was particularly true in the early 1980s when performance-oriented Americans were suffering through an onslaught of standard machines on the market. One bike Americans lusted after that the Europeans enjoyed was the Honda VF1000R. Here are a few fun facts about that machine. 1. In 1984, European riders, but not Americans, were able to swing a leg over the racer-styled Honda VF1000R. 2. The big V-four motor was derived from the tire-ripping FWS1000 that AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer “Fast Freddie” Spencer raced at Daytona in 1982. 3. Honda offered the VF1000F in America, rather than the racier VF1000R that Americans claimed they really wanted. 4. The VF1000R’s trick bits included gear-driven cams, quick-release front axle holders, adjustable clutch and front brake levers and a solo seat cowl. 5. Honda officials listened to the American consumers and sent the VF1000R to the United States in 1985. The bike didn’t sell because Honda sent its race-styled machine to the U.S. too late. Kawasaki was changing the open-class sport bike landscape with the original Ninja 900, which was lighter, quicker and cheaper. As a result, Honda

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AMA Member Ken Friedman’s quest to ride on all seven continents is just one of the fascinating and informative stories in the March 2020 issue of American Motorcyclist magazine. Readers of the AMA magazine will also get AMA Charter Life Member Cathy Seckman’s take on transitioning from a two-wheeler to a trike, enjoy a preview of some of the best road rallies on the planet in 2020 and get the latest motorcycling news in various states. You can read the issue online on this website. If you prefer a hard copy, you can get one delivered to your home provided you are a Life Member Plus member. Not a Life Member Plus member? Call AMA Member Services at (800) AMA-JOIN (262-5646) to join for just $29 a year. The membership includes a hard copy of the magazine, AMA roadside assistance that covers all the motorcycles, cars, trucks and RVs in your household, and more benefits. Friedman was on a mission to ride on all seven continents. He writes that his ride in Antarctica was the culmination of seven years of traveling through more than 50 countries. His adventure involves Italy, India, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Chile, Argentina and more fascinating countries. In

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You’ve put a lot of time in the saddle on your motorcycle. This year is a good time to be recognized by the American Motorcyclist Association and your peers. The AMA LongRider program recognizes dedicated riders and rewards them for being serious about the sport. How? The AMA LongRider program invites AMA members to register to earn patches for various mileage milestones. This is a road/adventure riding program. Mileage awards are available at 10,000, 25,000 and 50,000 annual miles. Or, let your miles accumulate for a Lifetime Mileage award at 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 250,000, 500,000, 750,000 and 1 million miles. Riders who achieve 1 million miles earn a special AMA LongRider plaque. To participate in this program, you must be a current AMA member, must agree to abide by AMA verification rules and procedures and must register for the program (miles begin to accumulate once registered). You may use multiple motorcycles to accumulate miles. Here is how it works: Riders register using the AMA LongRider application; mileage counts from that day forward, unless you can provide verification of previous mileage with documentation from an AMA-chartered club. (The AMA will consider verified mileage awards from non-AMA groups/clubs/dealers on a case-by-case basis.

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The 2020 riding season starts March 6 at the Wolf Pen Gap trails in the Ouachita National Forest near Mena, Ark. The trails offer everything you could want for a great day of riding, including fantastic views and a down-home friendly atmosphere. There are 35 miles of trails that feature terrain for everyone, from beginner to experienced riders. The difficulty of each trail is marked from easiest to “most difficult,” and the “most difficult.” The area has many small crystal-clear rivers and streams, and numerous picturesque waterfalls. If you want to take some time out from riding, you can try some fishing. There are also areas where groups stop and swim. Remember to always stay on the trails. That means no off-highway vehicles in the streams, and only cross streams at designated crossings. Mena, the closest town, is only nine miles west of the trails. Here you will find just about everything you need from groceries to fast food to full-service restaurants. Directions: To get there from Mena, take state Route 375 south for eight miles to the trailhead near CR 277. There are additional trailheads farther south on 375 and south on FR 38. All three separate trailheads offer

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Yamaha reports that its 2021 Ténéré 700 adventure-touring bike will be available in early summer 2020. The $9,999 mid-sized machine is powered by a fuel-injected 689cc liquid-cooled inline twin-cylinder engine. It sits in a lightweight tubular steel frame. The bike has a 62.6-inch wheelbase and has 9.5 inches of ground clearance. Suspension duties are handled by a long-travel 43mm inverted fork with 8.3 inches of travel and linkage-type rear shock with 7.9 inches of travel. Plus, the rear shock has a remote preload adjuster. Braking is handled by a pair of wave-style 282mm discs in front and a 245mm wave-style rotor in the rear. ABS is standard but can be temporarily disabled. The 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 features lightweight spoked wheels with a 21-inch up front and 18 in the back. The machine will be available in colors that Yamaha calls Ceramic Ice, Intensity White, and Matte Black. For more information go to https://www.yamahamotorsports.com/adventure-touring/models/tenere-700.

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Whether you are looking for collectible belt buckles, patches, pins or even books, the AMA eBay store has them. Probably the most valuable of the offerings are the limited-edition belt buckles, including the ones created to commemorate the Harley-Davidson 2003 Centennial, the AMA Great Destinations Daytona 200 Centennial, the AMA Great Destinations Bonneville Salt Flats and the AMA Great Destinations Loretta Lynn Ranch. The Loretta Lynn Ranch belt buckle, which is new and in its original felt box, is priced at $40. For several years the Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tenn., has been the center of the amateur motocross world every August. This AMA Great Destinations Commemorative buckle was produced in 2005. The AMA Great Destinations Loretta Lynn Ranch commemorative pin, which is also new in its original felt box, is $6. That pin was produced in 2005. Harley-Davidson fans will want to check out the Harley-Davidson Centennial buckle, key fob and pin set for $135. And if you’ve ridden Route 66, or want to, the AMA Route 66 Commemorative pin at $15 would look great on your riding jacket or vest. Also available, for $10, is a Vintage American Motorcycle Heritage Museum Foundation belt buckle that was

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California has several great places to ride dirt bikes, and the Jawbone Canyon Off-Highway Vehicle Area and the Dove Springs Off-Highway Vehicle Area, both near the town of Mojave in southern California, are a couple of them. They are both managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The Jawbone OHV area offers more than 7,000 acres of open-use public land you can ride. The OHV area offers cross-country riding as well as advanced technical routes. Outside the OHV area, riding is restricted to designated routes marked with brown trail markers. Travel maps are available at the Ridgecrest Field Office at 300 S. Richmond Road, Ridgecrest, Calif., (760) 384-5400, or the Jawbone Canyon OHV Station at the entrance to Jawbone Canyon off State Highway 14. The Jawbone open area is off State Highway 14, about 20 miles north of the intersection of State Highway 14 and 58 in the town of Mojave. It’s a left turn from State Highway 14 onto Jawbone Canyon Road when traveling from the south, and a right turn onto Jawbone Canyon Road when traveling from the north. There are three vault toilets located in the area. Food and fuel are available in the town of

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Another machine added to the retro stying mix for 2020 is the newly unveiled Indian Motorcycle FTR Rally, featuring scrambler styling with modern performance. The bike was officially launched internationally in Milan at EICMA in November 2019 and is now available in the United States. Indian calls the bike an “urban scrambler” but says it also handles back road adventures. The bike features a 1203cc V-twin engine that pumps out a claimed 123 horsepower and 87 foot-pounds of torque, a black trellis frame and inverted front suspension with dual Brembo brakes. Other features include cruise control, a USB fast charge port, higher ProTaper handlebars an LED headlight and LED turn signals. In the looks department, the FTR Rally features Titanium Smoke paint with the Indian Motorcycle headdress graphic, aluminium wire wheels with stainless steel spokes and a red pinstripe brown aviator seat, a windscreen and Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires. Want more? Indian says: “The 2020 FTR Rally is compatible with the entire range of 40-plus accessories specifically developed for the FTR platform, giving riders the ability to customize combinations and maintain the independence they seek when purchasing an Indian Motorcycle.” MSRP: $13,499. Info: www.IndianMotorcycle.com.

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